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Top Questions Content

  • When will my scores be available?

    2014 AP Exam scores will be available online in July. Visit apscore.org around the time of 2014 AP Exams for the 2014 score access calendar. Scores are currently available at apscore.org for exams from 2013 and earlier.

  • How do I view my scores?

    Note: 2014 AP Exam scores will be available online in July. Information about accessing 2014 AP scores will be available around the time of 2014 AP Exams.

    1. To access scores, go to AP Scores and select “View Your Scores.”
    2. Sign in to your College Board account.
      • You MUST have an account to get your scores.
      • You may already have an account if you’ve participated in other College Board programs. For example, you would already have a College Board account if you registered online for the SAT.
    3. If asked, provide the following information:
      • Your College Board account username and password.
      • Your AP number (the number on the labels in your Student Pack) OR your student identifier (student ID number) if you provided it on your answer sheet. If you don’t have your AP number, click the “I do not have my AP number” link and we will email your AP number to the email address you provided on your answer sheet.
  • Will a paper copy of my AP score report be sent to me in the mail?

    No. AP scores will only be available online through your College Board account.

  • Will my previous scores be included in my score report?

    All score reports are cumulative. Your entire score history will be sent to your designated college, university, or scholarship program unless you choose to withhold any of your scores (see Help topic “How do I withhold my score?”).

  • Some of my scores are not yet available. What do I do?

    Although most scores are available in July, a small percentage may not be. Some scores take longer to process due to late testing or other special circumstances (for example, late arrival of testing materials or extra time needed to match your records). You will receive an email when your delayed score arrives and is posted to your online score report. If you don’t receive your scores by September 1, contact us at apstudents@info.collegeboard.org or 888-225-5427 (toll free) or 212-632-1780.

    If you designated a college or university score recipient on your registration answer sheet, that institution will receive the scores that were available at the time the score report was generated. As your other scores become available, they will automatically be sent to that college or university. If you requested additional score reports for other institutions and delayed scores come in, your delayed scores will automatically be sent to these other institutions as well. This only applies to colleges or universities that you designated to receive scores from the current exam year.

  • How much does it cost to send scores?

    Each year you take AP Exams you receive one free score send by designating a college, university, or scholarship program on your first or “registration” AP answer sheet. The institution you pick receives your official score report, containing scores from every AP Exam you have ever taken, unless you have requested that one or more scores be withheld (see Help Topic “How do I withhold my score?”) or canceled (see Help Topic “How do I cancel my score?”).

    If you wish to send scores to additional colleges, each report costs $15. Reports with rush processing cost $25 each.

  • Who receives my scores?

    You, the college or university you designated on your answer sheet and educators in your school and district, including your AP teachers. You can submit an online request to send your scores to additional colleges and universities for a fee. Your parents do not have access to your scores, unless you’ve given them your College Board account information.

    If your school, district, or state partners with other educational organizations, for example, the National Math and Science Initiative, your scores and/or personally identifying information may be shared with those specific educational organizations. To determine whether your scores will be shared with any of these educational organizations, please consult your school.

    If you are a resident of the state of Kentucky, your AP Exam scores will automatically be sent to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KYHEAA). If you do not want your scores sent to KYHEAA, write to: AP Program, Educational Testing Service, 1425 Lower Ferry Road, 29Q, Ewing, NJ 08618. Be sure to include your full name, mailing address, date of birth, sex, eight-digit AP number, and your 6-digit high school code number.

  • Will I lose points if I answer a multiple-choice question incorrectly?

    Total scores on the multiple-choice section are based on the number of questions answered correctly. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers and no points are awarded for unanswered questions.

  • If I don't get a good score on an AP Exam, will it hurt my chances for college admission?

    Most likely not. Nearly 60 percent of all AP Exams are scored 3 or higher, indicating that the majority of AP students are succeeding at college-level course work. When we surveyed 100 admission officers, more than 75 percent indicated that a low score on an AP Exam would NOT harm an applicant’s admission prospects. (However, admission officers at highly selective colleges and universities appeared more likely to consider a low score a concern in the admission process.) When making admission decisions, colleges consider many more factors than just exam scores, including the strength of your course work and your GPA in rigorous courses. Colleges want to see that you are taking the most rigorous course work available to you. By enrolling in AP courses you demonstrate that you are interested in challenging yourself and learning at a college level.  

Accessing Scores: Creating and Using a College Board Account

  • Do I need a College Board account to access my scores?

    Yes, you must have an online College Board account to access your AP scores. You will not receive a paper score report in the mail. Sign up now.

    You may already have an account if you’ve registered for the SAT or participated in other College Board programs. If so, check that you have the correct username and password by signing in to your account. Having multiple accounts may delay access to all of your scores.

    For security purposes, you may be asked to verify your AP Profile before viewing scores – this additional step simply requires you to verify or enter basic information about yourself, including your AP number or student identifier (student ID number), so we can confirm your identity before displaying your scores. See apscore.org for information about when you can access your scores online.

  • Do I have to create a College Board account each time I want to view or send my scores?

    No, once you’ve created a College Board account, you will be able to use that account to view or send your scores (see Help section “Sending Scores”) for as long as you hold the account. You don’t need to create a new account each year that you take AP Exams. In fact, having multiple accounts may delay access to all of your scores.

    Please note that four years after your most recent AP Exam, your scores are removed from our online score reporting system and archived. To send your archived scores, complete the AP Scores Request Form and mail or fax it with payment to the address or number indicated.

  • I can’t create a College Board account because I’m under 13. How can I get my scores?

    If you are under the age of 13, you will receive a letter from the AP Program with score information. If you have questions, ask your parent/guardian to contact Customer Service at 888-225-5427 or 212-632-1780.

  • Why don't my username and/or password work when I try to sign in?

    Your password is case sensitive, so be sure to use the same uppercase or lowercase letters you used when you first set up your password. Use the “Forgot Username” or “Forgot Password” links for additional help.

    For more information about accessing your College Board online account visit Account Help.

  • I forgot my username or password — how do I get it?

    Visit Forgot username to have your username sent to the email address used to set up your account.

    Visit Forgot password and submit the username for your account.

    • If we have enough information to securely verify you online, you’ll be asked one security question. If you correctly answer the question, you can reset your password online and immediately access your account.
    • If we don’t have enough information to securely verify you online or you wish to bypass the security questions, we will email a temporary password to you. There’s an “Email Me My Password” option on the security question page.

    If you have any other questions about accessing your College Board online account visit Account Help.

  • What are the browser requirements for creating a College Board account and viewing and sending scores?

    See the current list of recommended browsers on the Help page for the College Board website.

  • Is my personal information safe online?

    Your privacy is very important to us, so we've put several measures in place to protect any personal information that you give us. Learn more about the College Board's online privacy protection by reading our Privacy Policy. We also recommend that you use certain Web browsers that let you submit personal information in a secure, encrypted form.

Accessing Scores: Verifying Your AP Profile

  • Why am I being asked to verify my AP Profile?

    For security purposes, you may be asked to verify your AP Profile before viewing scores. This additional step simply requires you to verify or enter basic information about yourself, including your AP number (see Help topic “What is an AP number?”) or student identifier (student ID number) (see Help topic “What is a student identifier or student ID number?”), so we can confirm your identity before displaying your scores.

  • What is an AP number?

    Each year that you take AP Exams, you receive a unique eight-digit AP number that serves as your official identifier for the exam administration. Your AP number appears on the bar-coded number labels in your AP Student Pack that you affix to all of your exam materials. We use the AP number to associate you with your scores. If you’re asked to verify your AP profile, you should enter your AP number and the year that you tested with that number (remember: your AP number is not the same from year to year).

  • What do I do if I don’t have my AP number?

    If you need your AP number from an exam taken in 2012 or later, when you log in, you will be able to click “I do not have my AP number” and enter the email address that you provided on your most recent AP answer sheet. Your AP number will then be emailed to you. Please note: you can only request that your 2014 AP number be emailed to you after 2014 scores are available online.

    If you provided your student identifier (student ID number) (see Help Topic “What is a student identifier or student ID number?”) on your registration answer sheet, you can use that code instead of your AP number to verify your AP profile.

    If you don’t have your AP number or student identifier, you can call AP Services at 888-225-5427 or 212-632-1780.

  • I requested my AP number but did not receive an email — how can I get it?

    We send the AP number to the email address entered on the AP registration answer sheet. If you provided another email address when requesting your AP number, try again with the email address you entered on your answer sheet. If we’re still unable to find your record, you can either enter your student identifier if you provided that on your answer sheet, or you can call AP Services at 888-225-5427 or 212-632-1780.

  • What is a student identifier or student ID number?

    Some states, districts, or schools assign each student a unique identification code called a student identifier or student ID number. If you entered your student identifier on your AP answer sheet this year, you can use it instead of your AP number to verify your AP profile and access your AP scores.

  • Why wasn’t I asked for my AP number when I accessed my scores online?

    If you’ve ever taken another College Board exam, such as the SAT, or you are a returning AP test-taker, the College Board was able to securely match your College Board account to your AP Exam record and you do not need to verify your account with an AP number or student ID.

  • How is my mailing address used?

    Your mailing address should match the address that you provided on your AP answer sheet. Your mailing address is used to help match your records in our systems and confirm your identity when contacting customer service. It is also used when mailing AP Scholar Award certificates and returning AP Studio Art portfolios. If you elected to participate in the Student Search Service, your mailing address will be shared with colleges, universities, scholarship programs, and educational opportunity organizations.

  • How is my email address used?

    Your email address is used to help match your records in our systems and provide you with important information about your scores. If you elected to participate in the Student Search Service, your email address will be shared with colleges, universities, scholarship programs and educational opportunity organizations.

  • How do I update my information?

    The online system will allow certain changes to your profile. Please log in to make your necessary changes. If you need further assistance, contact AP Services at 888-225-5427 or 212-632-1780.

Viewing Your Scores

  • When will my scores be available?

    2014 AP Exam scores will be available online in July. Visit apscore.org around the time of 2014 AP Exams for the 2014 score access calendar. Scores are currently available at apscore.org for exams from 2013 and earlier.

  • How do I view my scores?

    Note: 2014 AP Exam scores will be available online in July. Information about accessing 2014 AP scores will be available around the time of 2014 AP Exams.

    1. To access scores, go to AP Scores and select “View Your Scores.”
    2. Sign in to your College Board account.
      • You MUST have an account to get your scores.
      • You may already have an account if you’ve participated in other College Board programs. For example, you would already have a College Board account if you registered online for the SAT.
    3. If asked, provide the following information:
      • Your College Board account username and password.
      • Your AP number (the number on the labels in your Student Pack) OR your student identifier (student ID number) if you provided it on your answer sheet. If you don’t have your AP number, click the “I do not have my AP number” link and we will email your AP number to the email address you provided on your answer sheet.
  • Will a copy of my AP score report be sent to me in the mail?

    No. Your AP scores will only be available online through your College Board account.

  • Will my previous scores be included in my score report?

    All score reports are cumulative. Your entire score history will be sent to your designated college, university, or scholarship program unless you choose to withhold any of your scores (see Help topic “How do I withhold my score?”).

  • Some of my scores are not yet available. What do I do?

    Although most scores are available in July, a small percentage may not be. Some scores take longer to process due to late testing or other special circumstances (for example, late arrival of testing materials or extra time needed to match your records). You will receive an email when your delayed score arrives and is posted to your online score report. If you don’t receive your scores by September 1, contact us at apstudents@info.collegeboard.org or 888-225-5427 (toll free) or 212-632-1780.

    If you designated a college or university score recipient on your registration answer sheet, that institution will receive the scores that were available at the time the score report was generated. As your other scores become available, they will automatically be sent to that college or university. If you requested additional score reports for other institutions and delayed scores come in, your delayed scores will automatically be sent to these other institutions as well. This only applies to colleges or universities that you designated to receive scores from the current exam year.

  • Some of my exams are missing from my score report. What do I do?

    If you don’t see all of the exams that you took this year listed in your score report or you notice that exams that you took last year or earlier are missing, contact AP Services at apstudents@info.collegeboard.org or 888-225-5427 (toll free) or 212-632-1780.

  • How do I save a copy of my AP score report?

    Select “Download Score Report” to download an unofficial copy of your score report in PDF format. If your computer or device does not support PDFs, select the link to download the Adobe Acrobat software, or use the print screen function to save a copy of your scores.

  • When do I find out if I won an AP Scholar award?

    If you’ve earned one or more AP Scholar awards this year, they will be listed on your score report by September 1. You will receive an awards notification by email. Your AP Scholar award certificate(s) will be mailed to you in September.

Sending Your Scores

  • Why should I send my scores to colleges?

    The main reason to send AP Exam scores to a college is to earn credit or advanced placement. Most colleges have a policy that grants credit and/or advanced placement for AP Exam scores (usually scores of 3 or higher). If you do well on your AP Exams and don’t send scores to your college, you’ll miss out on getting valuable credit and the chance to skip course work you’ve already completed. Note: colleges will only accept the official AP score report sent by the College Board for credit and placement purposes. Explore college AP credit policies.

    Another reason to send scores is to support your college application(s). Your official scores provide admission officials with additional information they can use to evaluate how well you mastered college-level course work.

    Finally, some scholarships may require you to send AP scores.

  • How much does it cost to send scores?

    Each year you take AP Exams you receive one free score send by designating a college, university, or scholarship program on your first or “registration” AP answer sheet. The institution you pick receives your official score report, containing scores from every AP Exam you have ever taken, unless you have requested that one or more scores be withheld (see Help Topic “How do I withhold my score?”) or canceled (see Help Topic “How do I cancel my score?”).

    If you wish to send scores to additional colleges, each report costs $15. Reports with rush processing cost $25 each.

  • When should I send scores to colleges?

    It’s easiest and most cost-effective to send your scores to a college at the time you take your AP Exam. If you decide to wait, you can send your scores online for a $15 fee. In general, you should send your scores no later than July of your senior year of high school, and some universities have a July 15 deadline. Some colleges will not accept AP scores after you have arrived on campus as a freshman. When you designate a college/university to receive your scores, they will receive your entire score report from all AP Exams you have taken throughout high school unless you have requested score(s) to be withheld or canceled.

  • Should I send scores to colleges before my senior year?

    If you are taking AP Exams before your senior year and wish to send your scores to a college to which you know you’ll be applying, then make sure to bubble that college’s four-digit code on your registration AP answer sheet. You can also request additional score reports online. However, in your senior year, if you take an AP Exam and designate a college to receive your scores on your AP answer sheet, that college will receive your entire score report from all AP Exams you have taken throughout high school unless you have requested score(s) to be withheld or canceled.

  • How do I order additional score reports?

    You can place an online order for additional score reports to be sent to colleges, universities, scholarship programs or other programs. (This is in addition to the free score report that is sent to the college or university you designate on your first or “registration” AP answer sheet.) For complete details, including fees, visit Score Reporting Services.

  • How do I rush a score report?

    You can request rush processing for additional score reports. The fee for rush processing is higher ($25 per report) and delivery takes approximately 5–9 business days, so you will want to make sure that you are aware of the deadlines for the colleges and universities that you are applying to.

  • When will my college(s) receive my score?

    If you designated a college or university on your AP answer sheet, it should receive your scores by early to mid July. In some cases, you may be able to check your university website or your online account at the university you will be attending to confirm whether they have received your scores. Additional score report delivery dates vary, depending on the processing option you select:

    • Standard: If you select this option, your scores will be delivered to your designated college, university, or scholarship program in 7–14 days. The exact number of days depends on when you submit your request and the location of your score recipient. The fee is $15 per report.
    • Rush: If you select this option, your scores will be delivered to your designated college, university, or scholarship program in 5–9 days. The exact number of days depends on when you submit your request and the location of your score recipient. The fee is $25 per report.
  • I sent my scores last year. Do I need to send them again?

    If you didn’t take AP Exams since you sent your last official AP score report, then you probably don’t need to send your scores again. You’ll be able to view a history of all AP scores you’ve sent to colleges, universities, and scholarship programs online.

  • How can I see the colleges to which I’ve already sent scores?

    On your score report, select “Your past score orders.” On the “My scores sent to colleges” tab you can view your scores sent by college or university. On the “My orders” tab, you can view your individual orders and access details for each order, including the college or university the scores were sent to.

  • What if I won’t have access to a computer or the Internet when I need to send my scores?

    You can fax or mail the following information to AP Services:

    • Your legal name, mailing address, telephone number, social security number (if you provided it), and birth date
    • The name of the school where you took the exams
    • The years you took AP Exams and the names of the exams that you took
    • Your AP number
    • The name, city, state, and four-digit code of the college you want to receive your scores

    Payment: Your request will not be processed without payment. Each report costs $15. Reports with two-day rush processing cost $25 each. If you are faxing your request, you must pay by credit card — be sure to include a credit card number and expiration date. If you are mailing your request, enclose a check or money order made payable to AP Exams.

    AP Services
    Advanced Placement Program
    P.O. Box 6671
    Princeton, NJ 08541-6671
    Fax: 610-290-8979

  • What if I don’t wish to pay by credit card?

    You can mail the following information to AP Services:

    • Your legal name, mailing address, telephone number, social security number (if you provided it), and birth date
    • The name of the school where you took the exams
    • The years you took AP Exams and the names of the exams that you took
    • Your AP number
    • The name, city, state, and four-digit code of the college you want to receive your scores

    Payment: Your request will not be processed without payment. Each report costs $15. Reports with two-day rush processing cost $25 each. Enclose a check or money order made payable to AP Exams.

    AP Services
    Advanced Placement Program
    P.O. Box 6671
    Princeton, NJ 08541-6671
    Fax: 610-290-8979

Other Score Reporting Services

  • How do I cancel my score?

    If you wish to cancel your score, you must send a signed, written request to AP Services by mail or fax. Your request to cancel a score from the 2014 exam administration must be received by June 16, 2014 to ensure that the score does not appear in the score report sent to the college you designated on your registration answer sheet. Please note that once a score is canceled it cannot be reinstated. For complete details, visit Score Reporting Services.

  • How do I withhold my score?

    You may have one or more scores withheld from the report sent to the college you indicated on your answer sheet by sending a signed, written request to AP Services along with the withholding fee. To withhold scores from the 2014 exam administration, your request must be received by June 16, 2014. The score will be withheld from any future score reports sent to that particular college, and you will see an “optional service requested” link next to the withheld score on your online score report. If your request is not received with payment by June 16, the score is automatically sent to the college indicated on your answer sheet. You may later release the score to that college by sending AP Services a signed written request. For complete details, including deadlines and fees, visit Score Reporting Services.

  • I took AP Exams a long time ago, how do I send my old scores?

    Four years after your most recent AP Exam, your AP scores are removed from our online score reporting system and archived. To send your archived scores, complete the Archived AP Scores Request Form and mail or fax it to the address or number indicated. For complete details, including fees, visit Score Reporting Services.

  • What is the Multiple-Choice Rescore Service?

    If you are concerned that your score has not been accurately reported as a result of a scanning or processing error, you may request that your multiple-choice answer sheet be rescored by hand. This score and your free-response score are then appropriately weighted and combined. The resulting score is converted to an AP score and compared with the reported score. If the scores are different, the rescored score will prevail and will be provided to you and your score recipient. For complete details, including deadlines and fees, visit Score Reporting Services.

About Scores

  • What is the score scale for AP Exams?

    The final score for each AP Exam is reported on a 5-point scale that offers a recommendation about how qualified you are to receive college credit and placement:

    5 = extremely well qualified

    4 = well qualified

    3 = qualified

    2 = possibly qualified

    1 = no recommendation

    The AP Program conducts studies in all AP subjects to compare the performance of AP students with that of college students in comparable college courses. These studies help set the “cut points” that determine how AP students’ composite scores are translated into an AP score of 1–5. AP Exam scores of 5 are equivalent to grades of A+ and A in the corresponding college course. AP Exam scores of 4 are equivalent to grades of A-, B+, and B in college. AP Exam scores of 3 are equivalent to grades of B-, C+, and C in college.

  • Who receives my scores?

    You, the college or university you designated on your answer sheet and educators in your school and district, including your AP teachers. You can submit an online request to send your scores to additional colleges and universities for a fee. Your parents do not have access to your scores, unless you’ve given them your College Board account information.

    If your school, district, or state partners with other educational organizations, for example, the National Math and Science Initiative, your scores and/or personally identifying information may be shared with those specific educational organizations. To determine whether your scores will be shared with any of these educational organizations, please consult your school.

    If you are a resident of the state of Kentucky, your AP Exam scores will automatically be sent to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KYHEAA). If you do not want your scores sent to KYHEAA, write to: AP Program, Educational Testing Service, 1425 Lower Ferry Road, 29Q, Ewing, NJ 08618. Be sure to include your full name, mailing address, date of birth, sex, eight-digit AP number, and your 6-digit high school code number.

Taking AP Exams

  • Can I take the AP Exam if I haven't taken an AP course?

    Yes. Because the College Board is committed to providing access to the AP Exams to homeschooled students and students whose schools do not offer AP it does not require students to take an AP course prior to taking an AP Exam.

    You should study the kinds of skills and content outlined in the Course Description for your subject, because they represent the basis for the AP Exam. The best way to do so is in a year-long AP course in which the students and teachers focus on college-level work. However, if you have taken strong courses and/or have studied in depth on your own, you may be able to perform quite well on the AP Exam. Get to know the exams by reviewing free practice questions. Complete released exams are available for a fee in the College Board Store.

  • I want to take an AP Exam and I have a disability. Can I make any testing arrangements to accommodate my disability?

    If you have a documented disability, you may be eligible for accommodations on AP Exams. Learn more about testing accommodations for AP Exams and contact your school's AP Coordinator.

  • What’s the average score for AP Exams?

    The mean score for the 2013 AP Exams was 2.89. Nearly 60 percent of all exams taken earned a score of 3 or higher. To learn more about individual exams visit AP Score Distributions.

  • How many times can I repeat an AP Exam?

    You can take an AP Exam each time it is offered (AP Exams are offered once a year in May).

    Your score report will include your scores for all the AP Exams you have taken, including yearly "repeats" of the same subject exam. You have the option to withhold (see Help topic “How do I withhold my score?" ) a score from a college or cancel (see Help topic “How to I cancel my score?") the score altogether. See Score Reporting Services for more information.

  • When are the exams given?

    AP Exams are usually scheduled during the first two weeks of May. See the current exam calendar for specific exam dates and times, or ask your AP Coordinator. Early testing or testing at times other than those published by the College Board is not permitted under any circumstances.

  • How much time does it take to complete an AP Exam?

    Most of the exams take two to three hours to complete. For subjects that correspond to half-year college courses, the exam is closer to two hours in length. Most exams have a 10-minute break between Sections I and II. Additional time is required for things like completing identification information on the answer sheet, listening to exam instructions and receiving and returning exam materials. Your AP Coordinator should notify you when and where to report for the exams.

  • Will I lose points if I answer a multiple-choice question incorrectly?

    Total scores on the multiple-choice section are based on the number of questions answered correctly. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers and no points are awarded for unanswered questions.

  • May I bring something to eat or drink on exam day?

    You are not permitted to bring food or drink, including bottled water, into the exam room (unless they have been approved as an accommodation by the College Board Services for Students with Disabilities office). During the 10-minute break between Sections I and II of the exam, you can leave the exam room to get a drink of water or a snack with your proctor’s permission.

  • Who do I contact to report suspected cheating?

    Although AP Exams are administered under strict supervision and secure conditions, misconduct or testing irregularities may occur. Please contact the Office of Testing Integrity as soon as possible if you observe behavior that is in violation of the College Board’s test security and test administration policies or procedures.

    Office of Testing Integrity

    800-353-8570 (toll free in the U.S. and Canada) or 609-406-5427

    609-406-9709 (fax)

    tsreturns@ets.org

  • I received a phone call from someone claiming to work for the College Board, asking me to provide personal information or purchase test prep. Is this legitimate?

    From time to time, we receive reports of phone scams in which callers posing as employees of the College Board contact students and families and attempt to sell test preparation products or request sensitive personally identifying information, such as credit card and social security numbers. These calls do not come from the College Board. This type of activity, known as telemarketing fraud, is a crime. Should you receive an unsolicited phone call from someone claiming to work for the College Board, even one which your caller ID identifies as originating from a College Board location (some of these callers engage in illegal "spoofing" to make it seem as if the call is coming from the actual company), do not provide the caller with any personal information. The College Board does not make unsolicited phone calls to students or families requesting this type of information. Representatives of the College Board only make calls to students and their families in response to student-generated inquiries and/or to provide students and families with information about a test or program for which the student registered. Should you have a question about the origin of a phone call you have received in which the caller claims to be from the College Board, contact us at 866-756-7346.

    Safety and Security Tips

    1. Be wary of unsolicited contacts, whether via telephone or email.
    2. Remember that the College Board will never contact you to ask you to send your credit card, bank account, or password information over the telephone or through email.
    3. Never supply credit card information to someone who calls or emails you.
    4. If you suspect you have received a fraudulent call or email, contact the Federal Trade Commission and your local authorities and provide them with all the details.
    5. Keep in mind that if an offer appears too good to be true, it probably is.

    To make a complaint, and to obtain more information about protecting yourself from telephone and Internet scams, visit the Federal Trade Commission's Consumer Information site.

AP and College Admission, Credit and Placement

  • If I don't get a good score on an AP Exam, will it hurt my chances for college admission?

    Most likely not. Nearly 60 percent of all AP Exams are scored 3 or higher, indicating that the majority of AP students are succeeding at college-level course work. When we surveyed 100 admission officers, more than 75 percent indicated that a low score on an AP Exam would NOT harm an applicant’s admission prospects. (However, admission officers at highly selective colleges and universities appeared more likely to consider a low score a concern in the admission process.) When making admission decisions, colleges consider many more factors than just exam scores, including the strength of your course work and your GPA in rigorous courses. Colleges want to see that you are taking the most rigorous course work available to you. By enrolling in AP courses you demonstrate that you are interested in challenging yourself and learning at a college level.  

  • Which colleges offer credit and placement for AP scores?

    Most colleges and universities in the United States and institutions in more than 60 other countries grant credit or placement for qualifying AP Exam scores. Typically, a score of 3 or higher is required, and you must send your official score report to the college. You can find a college’s AP policy using the AP Credit Policy Info search — however, be sure to review the policy on the college’s website for the most up-to-date information.

  • Who sends my scores to colleges and universities?

    Only you can request that your scores be sent to your college(s). To ensure that they receive legitimate scores, colleges and universities will only recognize the official AP score report sent by the College Board at your request. For example, if you simply write your AP scores on your college applications, including the Common Application, they will not count for credit and placement purposes. Colleges won’t recognize your student score report for credit either; you must request that the College Board send an official score report directly to the college. For complete details, including fees, visit Score Reporting Services.

  • Which scores should I send?

    Your score report contains scores from all of the AP Exams you have ever taken. Your college will only use those scores that meet the minimum required score to receive credit or placement. You do have the option to withhold a score from a particular college, or cancel a score altogether— see Score Reporting Services for procedures, costs, and details.

  • What is advanced placement and how is it different from credit?

    Many colleges and universities award advanced placement based on your AP Exam scores, which allows you to skip introductory classes, enter higher-level classes, and/or fulfill general education requirements. Placement is not the same thing as credit, which means you actually earn points toward your college degree. Colleges may offer both credit and placement, just credit or just placement for successful AP scores. Visit your college’s website or talk to an admission officer to find out which kind of recognition is offered.